Tag Archives: Christmas

Happy Holidays!

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Happy Holidays!

I recently found a newsletter from a conservative political organization in my email inbox.  After considering for a moment from what possible source the organization had collected my email address, I read through the opening article.  It was a joyous shout out to the President-Elect, giving him the credit for doing away with political correctness and making it possible for Christians to once again say “Merry Christmas.”

Um, what?  I must have missed the notice banning that phrase.  I use it with confidence, among people who celebrate Christmas, especially on Christmas Day, itself.  I also use “season’s greetings” and “happy holidays.”  If I know what holiday, other than Christmas, an acquaintance celebrates, I offer my good wishes for that holiday.  I do not consider this “political correctness,” and here’s why.

In the church calendar, Christmas is one day.  One very important day, of course, but just one.  The season leading up to it is Advent – four weeks of waiting and preparing our hearts.  We light a candle each Sunday of Advent; the candles represent hope, joy, peace and love.  These are the gifts Christ brings with Him, and they are bundled together in my mind when I say or write “season’s greetings.”

If we are supposed to show the love of Christ, why do we get bogged down in arguing about these words?  All the holiday greetings, at their heart, are expressions of good will and joy.  Yes, there are other holidays included in “happy holidays.”  So what?  When someone who celebrates a different winter holiday, or who celebrates Christmas secularly, wishes me happiness, I’m grateful.  Their thoughtfulness does not diminish the importance of Christ to me, or in the world.  When I wish non-Christians well, I am loving my neighbor; again, including whatever holiday they celebrate, by using a generic “happy holidays,” or even by specifically wishing them “happy solstice” (for example), does nothing do diminish Christ and the importance of His birth.  In fact, by sharing these seasonal greetings, we increase the love, hope, peace and joy in the world.  Politically correct or not, isn’t that a good thing?

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More Kuspuks, and Doll Hair

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I made this sweet little doll in a kuspuk as a donation to my daughter’s school fund-raiser. I think she came out really well – and my daughter’s teacher was the winning bidder!

Kuspuk Dolly No. 2 and her clothes

With her hood up

Now, I really have to finish up a custom order of dolls. A local lady gives handmade dolls to her 5 nieces every year for Christmas, and this year, I was lucky enough to win her business. The 5 dolls I’ve made are about 18″ tall, with embroidered faces and black velour yarn hair. They will all wear socks or tights, undies, shoes and a kuspuk (a traditional garment worn by some groups of Alaska Natives). I found instructions for human-sized kuspuks, then scaled them down for my dolls’ proportions. All 5 doll bodies are sewn and stuffed, and I can see the light at the end of the tunnel on the kuspuks. The undies and footwear won’t take long, but I’ve been pulling my hair out over the dolls‘ hair! When I was a kid, I always disliked doll hair that was only sewn down along a central part, the way rag doll hair usually is. If I untied the doll’s braids or undid her ponytails, I then had a doll with a long mohawk – the sides of her head would be bald. I preferred rag dolls to baby or fashion dolls, but the plastic dolls had rooted hair that could be brushed and styled. And what little girl doesn’t want to styled their dolls’ hair? So, now that I’m making rag dolls, I’ve been trying to solve this problem, without buying doll wigs. So far, I have one doll with the traditional central part and one with a crocheted cap with strands of yarn knotted all over it. (The doll’s scalp showed through the cap, so I covered her head with some black fabric.) And 3 bald dolls.

1 kuspuk, 3 wigs, 5 undies, 10 socks and 10 shoes to go!

By the way, sorry about the crappy photos – natural light is pretty hard to come by in Fairbanks in November!