Food for Thought

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I took the kids to our local used book store the other day.  I didn’t want to buy anything but a snack (Boy said he just wanted to read, not buy anything. Mm-hm.), but a book called WorldChanging: A User’s Guide for the 21st Century, edited by Alex Steffen, was sitting in the el cheapo bin, staring at me. It is a collection of strategies and solutions and possibilities meant to inspire people into facing the ecological difficulties the planet is in. It has chapters on “stuff,” shelter, cities, community, business, politics, and planet.  I thought I’d take a look at the section on “movement building” in the politics chapter.  I think the following quote, written by Steffen, was worth the $4 I ended up spending:

  Optimism is a political act.
Entrenched interests promote despair, confusion, and apathy to prevent change.  They encourage us to think that problems can’t be solved, that nothing we do can matter, that the issues are too complex to allow even the possibility of change.  It is a long-standing political art to sow the seeds of mistrust among those you would rule: as Machiavelli taught, tyrants do not care if they are hated, so longs as those under them do not love one another.  Cynicism is often seen as a rebellious attitude in Western popular culture, but in reality, our cynicism advances the desires of the powerful:  cynicism is obedience.
Optimism, by contrast, when it’s neither foolish nor silent, can be revolutionary.  When no one believes in a better future, despair is a logical choice–and people in despair almost never change anything.  When no one believes there might be a better solution, those who benefit from the status quo are safe.  When no one believes in the possibility of action, apathy becomes an insurmountable obstacle to reform.  But when people have some intelligent reasons to believe that a better future can be  built, that better solutions are available, and that action is possible, their power to act out of their highest principles is unleashed.  Shared belief in a better future is the strongest glue there is.
Great movements for social change always begin with statements of great optimism.  Facing as we do today so many interlocking challenges, one of our biggest tasks is simply this:  to be willing to look so many looming catastrophes in the face and courageously point out that radical changes for the better are possible.  History attests that if we can show people a better future, we can build movements that will change the world.

One Way to Reuse a Wine Bottle . . .

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So, ages ago (years ago, really), I had an idea for a cool polymer clay embellishment for an empty wine bottle.  It has taken me a long time, working in spurts, to finally finish it, but here it is:

The front shows a little cabin in the woods, with snow-covered mountains in the background.  It is a spring scene, so the birch or aspen trees have yellowy green leaves, and there are wild roses and irises in bloom.  Sigh.  It’s really not spring here (-28 degrees Fahrenheit this morning, and that’s warmed up about 20 degrees since last week!), so I’m gazing wistfully at this little clay world, willing spring to get here soon. 🙂

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The back lets you see the backyard.  The axe is stuck in the chopping block, and there’s a path back to the outhouse (you can just see that necessity – it’s in the middle left of the photo, above the irises).

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And here are a couple of close ups.

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It is for sale in my Art Fire shop, Butterscotch Grove, along with a few other things.  I’ll be going through my old never-posted stock from when I worked the Tanana Valley Farmer’s Market a few years ago and adding those items to my shop over the next week or so.  Those things will be bargains!

Happy New Year!

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This year I plan to tackle 3 storage issues.

  1. I store way too much physical stuff in my house.  I need to cut back on the amount of stuff I buy, and seek out stuff that comes with less packaging. I have a tendency to save packaging, and everything else, as “art supplies.” But I never use much of it.  Sorting through it all makes me tired.
  2. I store way too much “inspiration” – books and magazines full of fun ideas for craft projects or new techniques; “pins” on Pinterest, “favorites” on Instructables…I accumulate new ideas for stuff I want to do or make nearly every day.  But I rarely make or do any of it.  Having all that stuff just makes me tired.
  3. I store way too much potential energy on my person. 🙂  I have plenty of fat reserves I could be converting to action, but I rarely make use of them.  Carrying the extra weight makes me tired.

I’m tired of being tired! So this year, my 50th (!!!), I’m doing a reset.  I’m gonna use what I have or get rid of it.

These aren’t really resolutions, just the result of getting fed up with myself and all the clutter I (and my family) deal with everyday, which happens to coincide with my birthday last month.

Any advice from readers who have tamed the clutter monster and have kept it caged?  (Not you, MIL – The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up was enough! 🙂 )

Happy Holidays!

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Happy Holidays!

I recently found a newsletter from a conservative political organization in my email inbox.  After considering for a moment from what possible source the organization had collected my email address, I read through the opening article.  It was a joyous shout out to the President-Elect, giving him the credit for doing away with political correctness and making it possible for Christians to once again say “Merry Christmas.”

Um, what?  I must have missed the notice banning that phrase.  I use it with confidence, among people who celebrate Christmas, especially on Christmas Day, itself.  I also use “season’s greetings” and “happy holidays.”  If I know what holiday, other than Christmas, an acquaintance celebrates, I offer my good wishes for that holiday.  I do not consider this “political correctness,” and here’s why.

In the church calendar, Christmas is one day.  One very important day, of course, but just one.  The season leading up to it is Advent – four weeks of waiting and preparing our hearts.  We light a candle each Sunday of Advent; the candles represent hope, joy, peace and love.  These are the gifts Christ brings with Him, and they are bundled together in my mind when I say or write “season’s greetings.”

If we are supposed to show the love of Christ, why do we get bogged down in arguing about these words?  All the holiday greetings, at their heart, are expressions of good will and joy.  Yes, there are other holidays included in “happy holidays.”  So what?  When someone who celebrates a different winter holiday, or who celebrates Christmas secularly, wishes me happiness, I’m grateful.  Their thoughtfulness does not diminish the importance of Christ to me, or in the world.  When I wish non-Christians well, I am loving my neighbor; again, including whatever holiday they celebrate, by using a generic “happy holidays,” or even by specifically wishing them “happy solstice” (for example), does nothing do diminish Christ and the importance of His birth.  In fact, by sharing these seasonal greetings, we increase the love, hope, peace and joy in the world.  Politically correct or not, isn’t that a good thing?

Which way is up?

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It is true that I don’t know which way to turn this painting, but “which way is up?” is really how I’ve been feeling about a lot of things in 2016.  Honestly, I feel a lot better about how this painting came out than about how this year went.

Acrylic paint on 8″ x 10″ canvas board,